'cider' on Serious Eats

5 Festive Ciders to Spice up Your Holidays

If you haven't eaten at least two dozen cookies by New Year's Day then you are doing something wrong. Along with all that butter, cinnamon, and sugar, it's the time to reach for flavorful, full-bodied ciders. American cider makers have embraced these colder months by releasing ciders packed with cranberries, spices, and a big heaping of holiday cheer. More

Gift Guide: For Cider Lovers

Whether your loved ones are gluten free gourmands or adventurous homebrewers, cider just might be on their holiday wish lists. We're here to help with gift ideas: books, bottles, gear, and even a weekend getaway that your favorite cider lover is sure to enjoy. More

Highlights from Franklin County CiderDays 2013

For nineteen years—long before every magazine was telling us that "hard cider is easy choice for fall"—farmers and cider makers in western Massachusetts have gathered to celebrate autumn and their region's long relationship with apples. Originally a small harvest festival for local producer West County Cider, CiderDays has grown into the most recognized cider event in the United States. More

Spiked Hot Cider: 5 Fun Variations to Make at Home

Every Saturday during the fall, the farmers' market in my neighborhood becomes an urban orchard, with countless varieties of apples spilling out of rickety crates. I always stop at the hot cider stand; something about the sharpness of the air and the cutting edge of wind turns warm apple cider into an antidote. The antidote becomes even more powerful with a splash of liquor. Here are five recipes to inspire a little boozy cider celebration. More

Cider Apple Guide: Bittersharps

When I first learned there were more—many more—apples than I could find at my local Shoprite, I went on a mission to try every one of them. But I didn't want to try them in the delicious, fermented form for which they were intended. I wanted to pull each cider apple off the tree and take a big ol' bite out of it. Because if you are really into cider, then you can handle the coarse, papery fruit that's often referred to as 'inedible?' Right? I was sure that once I got past that first bite—like spitting out that first sip of hard liquor—there would be a world of wonder beneath. Well, I was wrong. More

Cider Apple Guide: Bittersweets

If there is one style of apple prized above all others by American cider makers, it's the bittersweet apple. Affectionately referred to as a "spitter," these apples are low in acid, high in tannin, and impart the classic flavor of finer French and English ciders. At first bite, most would consider bittersweet fruit inedible. But what is ill suited for the fruit bowl is ideal for the cider press. More

Cider Apple Guide: Sharps, Sweets, and Sharp-Sweets

Most of the trees bearing traditional cider apples in the US were replaced during Prohibition, and even though American cider makers are planting hundreds of acres of cider fruit trees each year, those trees aren't bearing a ton of fruit just yet. In the meantime, the same varieties you see at your local grocery story—favorites such as Gala, Golden Delicious, and Granny Smith—provide the base for most American cider today. Thankfully, when blended with more structured cider fruits, these apples can still make a fine cider. More

Rosé Ciders to Try this Summer

There is no better conversation starter in the world of cider than pouring a rosé cider. After all, apple juice is yellow, right? But this cider is pink. Or crimson. Are there grapes involved? Perhaps berries? At best, most people assume food coloring or some sort of extract is added to the cider. Most people are wrong. More

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