Slideshow: Show and Tell: Your Latte Art

Unusual Tulip
Unusual Tulip
"This is a mocha I poured a little over a week ago at Blacksmith, the cafe I work at in Houston, Texas. The design would be classified as a tulip, but what makes this one a little different than others is how much infusion was achieved by pushing the base layer to wrap all the way around to the very top and tucking into the middle layers. This also allows hearts to be created using the negative space of the darker, espresso-and-mocha mix in addition to the hearts created with the white of the milk."—John L, Blacksmith in Houston TX
Watch carefully...
Watch carefully...
"I poured the simple rosetta design using the typical technique I learned watching other baristas, years ago, while I was still new on bar. My best advice on learning latte art technique is closely watching other baristas pour, as often as possible, whether at work or on YouTube."—Sadie D, Bluebird Coffee Shop
Like a phoenix from the ashes...
Like a phoenix from the ashes...
"The phoenix is two tight rosettas placed as symmetrically as possible on either side of the cup, followed through with the neck and head in the middle. I use a thermometer tip to give the phoenix its eyes and "comb". Don't follow through the rosetta like you would typically do with the swan as it'll warp your other rosetta, but I like symmetry in latte art, each to their own!"—Muki Y
An Elephant!
An Elephant!
From Eric Yochim, owner of Two Rivers Craft Coffee Company in Colorado.
Short Necked Swan = Turkey
Short Necked Swan = Turkey
"Turkey latte! This is made with a rosetta as a the body/feathers, and then pouring foam to create the neck with a small oval for the head at the end. I used a thermometer to dot the eye. Pouring a longer neck makes a swan!"—Scott E
It takes practice (and lots of milk)
It takes practice (and lots of milk)
"For beginners, it is going to be about muscle memory because fluid dynamics is not a common everyday practice. It's going to take time, so beginners shouldn't get frustrated. I taught myself how to pour and it took about 20 gallons of milk to make my first heart. If a beginner is wanting to speed up the process it is best to have a trainer or mentor."—Dean K.
Put a little heart into it...
Put a little heart into it...
"It's a hybrid of a heart and a tulip. You start pouring as if you were going to pour a heart, then once it's completely formed, where you would pour the 'leaves' for a tulip, you just keep on that pour until it builds out, and then swipe just like normal. It's all based off of the milk texture, and espresso crema."—Donny Morrison of De Cafe Baristas, Monterey Park CA
Tulip tips
Tulip tips
"I like to groom (swirl) my milk in the pitcher up until the point of the pour. I begin the pour slowly, creating a solid platform of crema and milk for the latte art to float upon. About 2/3 of the way up from the rim of the cup, I speed up the pour and bring the pitcher very close to the surface of the milk (I will even "clink" the pitcher on the rim of the cup). This design is two separate pours, and to cut through the design, creating a symmetrical design, I bring the pitcher up quickly in order to not create a literal line through it."—Chelsea T, Counter Culture
Layers and layers
Layers and layers
"It's a Tigerwalk espresso latte wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma. Pro tip: don't wiggle, just rock!"—Adam B.
Four Leaf Tulip
Four Leaf Tulip
"Just froth the milk as usual, pull a shot of espresso (preferably 20-25cc from 19-21gr of coffee), pour out a little bit of foam out, start up pouring high in a small stream, then downwards making an apple, stop half way and start pouring again to form the first leaf, rinse and repeat and pull through the end of the cup like with a rosetta. Just a lot of practice :)"—Gerben E. of Black & Bloom in The Netherlands