Slideshow: Snapshots from Portland Cocktail Week 2013

A Quick Cocktail Intro
A Quick Cocktail Intro

The Imperial's Brandon Wise kicked off Portland Cocktail Week on Saturday morning with the first consumer class. After a brief history of cocktails, he discussed shaking and stirring, and why you might choose each technique. The basic takeaway: Stirring is generally for drinks made up of just spirits, while shaking is used when other elements, such as juice, are added.

Those in attendance were invited up to try their hand at both mixing methods, preparing shaken Maple Leafs and stirred Manhattans. Wise, who has been with Portland Cocktail Week since its inception, was eager to answer questions and reminded the crowd "this is the best time in history to like things that taste good."

Swig n' Swine
Swig n' Swine

One of PDXCW's trademark "after school activities" is Swig n' Swine, presented by the Bon Vivants (the team behind Trick Dog in San Francisco) at the Jupiter Hotel. The pig roast and punch party is a chance to raise money for charity, and sample drinks featuring liquors from the event's various sponsors.

Examples of the punches include Cosa Nostra, made with Templeton Rye, Carpano Antica, and Fernet Branca, plus pumpkin, orange, lemon, salt, chai tea, and almond milk, and Captain of Infantry, featuring Don Q Anejo Rum, The King's Ginger, plum wine, Shrub & Co. Tart Apple Shrub, lemon, Fee Brothers Walnut Bitters, bay leaf, and oolong.

An On Campus Party
An On Campus Party

We saw lots of hugs, handshakes, and high fives at Swing n Swine. It's one of the first opportunities the students had to begin bonding, or see old friends. In addition to the food and booze, there are activities such as a horseshoes tournament, a DJ playing in the party tent, and even a gelato cart sponsored by Luxardo, with flavors such as Fernet and Cola and Chocolate and Ginger.

Cocktail Carts
Cocktail Carts

One of the trademark features at Multnomah Whiskey Library is its collection of cocktail carts. Equipped with all the necessary tools, they allow bartenders to prepare libations table-side. A return to focusing on service was a theme echoed over and over again during the week's events.

I’ll Take Manhattans, The Story of Bitters
I’ll Take Manhattans, The Story of Bitters

Dale DeGroff presented a class to consumers entitled I’ll Take Manhattans, The Story of Bitters. In addition to a history of bitters, their ingredients, and uses, five different bitters—Angostura, Dr. Adam Elmegirab's Boker's, The Bitter Truth Old Time Aromatic, DeGroff's own Pimento Aromatic, and Fee Brothers Whiskey Barrel Aged—were poured for tasting, first alone, and then in otherwise identical Manhattans. He used this selection to illustrate the drastic difference bitters can make. About the bitters market today, DeGroff said "it's good again."

Advanced Bar Technique
Advanced Bar Technique

Panelists Joaquin Simo of Pouring Ribbons, Sam Ross from Attaboy, and Angus Winchester, Tanqueray Global Ambassador spoke about technique and strategy during this course. Moderator Derek Brown, of Washington D.C.'s The Passenger, broke the issues of bar technique down into a few categories: people, property, profit, and product. The four pros focused on concepts such as personality, mise en place, and timing. The group emphasized that bartending is about making the customer feel welcome into a world that can be overwhelming. According to Simo, "your bar personality is an amplified version of your regular personality."

Simo stressed that a bar's layout can improve a customer's experience: owners should aim for bar a setup that requires as little bartender movement as possible. "Good bar design speeds up service," he said. The panel emphasized that a skilled bartender should learn which drinks need to go out immediately, and which can sit for a minute, which will help them determine the order of preparation so that a group's drink order can all be served at once.

All Hands on Deck
All Hands on Deck

All Portland Bartender Institute students were required to take The Art of Service as part of the core curriculum. Seattle's Murray Stenson joined Adkins, Simo, and Shoemaker to once again discuss just how important service is to the cocktail industry. Stenson, who suffered from heart troubles in 2012, received two standing ovations from the crowd. "Working a bar is not just about serving drinks, it's about creating a community," he said.

Adkins shared specific tips on everything from the proper way to stand behind the bar (Standing with an open stance, with your back always towards the bar, and always facing the guest, never crossing your arms or hunching over the bar), to how to greet guests (say: "Hi, my name is...") Adkins stressed: "Service is active, it's not passive…it's our job to really craft the experience."

Fords Gin Negroni
Fords Gin Negroni

The Eighty Six Company showcased their portfolio of spirits with drinks prepared by Jeffrey Morgenthaler of Clyde Common, among others. PDXCW attendees told us that three and four ingredient recipes are gaining popularity over more modernist takes, at least in some circles.

Dushan Zaric
Dushan Zaric

Dushan Zaric, best known for Employees Only in New York City, is one of the men behind The Eighty Six Company. He was on hand at the event to talk about the group's Aylesbury Duck Vodka, Fords Gin, Cana Brava Rum, and Tequila Cabeza.

Desert Diablo Punch
Desert Diablo Punch

Rich Heider II, of Scotsdale, Arizona's Market Street Kitchen, said he likes Aviation in Collins-style drinks because it has light botanicals. He prepared a Desert Diablo Punch, with Aviation, freshly pressed lime juice, prickly pear syrup, and ginger beer, topped off with a blackberry.

Travis Tober of Austin, Texas concocted a drink called The Devil Went Down to Texas, mixing Aviation with lime juice, Bad Dog Fire & Damnation Bitters, and grapefruit soda.

Road Soda
Road Soda

Four Roses Bourbon sponsored Road Soda back at Jupiter Hotel. Derek Brown and Brandon Wise prepared a number of different bourbon-based cocktails alongside Brian Gilbert of Teardrop Cocktail Lounge, out of a 1967 Airstream.

Distillery No. 209 Negroni at The Imperial
Distillery No. 209 Negroni at The Imperial

One of the weekend's most exciting concepts was Bar MashUPs, which brought bartenders from across the country to share shifts at Portland bars. Erik Hakkinen of Seattle's Zig Zag Cafe, for example, worked alongside Brandon Wise at The Imperial. Lindsey Johnson told us that having bartenders actually making drinks, rather than pouring from a big pre-mixed batch, is something she's proud of. (Batch pouring is pretty common at big cocktail events.) "That's not what people came for. There's no other way you could see Pouring Ribbons, Rum Club, Broken Shaker, Oven and Shaker, Monkey Pod, and Hale Pele in one night…but I don't want to go and see them pour batch. I want to go see them work!"

Aperiteaf Cocktail
Aperiteaf Cocktail

After tasting all three varieties, attendees were invited to create a cocktail called Aperiteaf, using their favorite of the three varieties. Two parts Lillet were combined with one part brewed raspberry tea—any fruit tea will do—and a half part honey syrup. Ice was added and the glass, which was then topped off with Q Sparkling Grapefruit and garnished with fresh mint. This refreshing drink is pretty low in alcohol, and would work well at brunch.