Slideshow: First Look: Cocktails at Henry, a Liquor Bar in the Hudson Hotel, New York

Deadly Nightshade ($16)
Deadly Nightshade ($16)

"Aubergine is used more prevalently in the U.S. than the U.K., and we wanted to have something golden and rich that felt autumnal," says Chetiyawardana. Eggplants are quartered and covered in demerara sugar before being roasted, then pureed with more raw sugar and water before being strained twice.

This puree becomes the base for a cocktail mixed with Bacardi 8-year aged rum and Lillet Blanc. Fresh lemon juice is added, and the lot gets shaken with egg white for a texture that Chetiyawardana says "holds all the flavors on the tongue." The drink is garnished with a slice of dehydrated eggplant made into a crisp, framed in more raw sugar.

Chocolate Cocktail ($16)
Chocolate Cocktail ($16)

This Chocolate Cocktail is "sweet and luxurious, when you need something rich and want to take yourself away," Chetiyawardana says. Fresh cherries are preserved in maraschino liqueur and demerara sugar. The surplus liqueur from the whole cherries "provides the rich, dry notes of maraschino cherries along with the plump notes of the fresh cherries, and offsets the complex, herbal notes of Yellow Chartreuse without being heavy on the alcohol." A whole egg is shaken into the drink, making it reminiscent of a classic chocolate cocktail (which s a mix of maraschino and blackberry liqueurs mixed with Yellow Chartreuse and egg). The only chocolate that appears in the drink is a shaving of Valrhona dark chocolate over the top.

Polleno ($16)
Polleno ($16)

Chetiyawardana blends "sweet red apples, cooked sous vide to key out their sweetness," with freshly pressed green apple juice to balance the "sharp malic acid bite, which almost has a green olive note about it." That combination is then shaken with Umberto Fino Sherry and egg white, then topped with a dusting of fennel pollen.

Holy Spritz ($16)
Holy Spritz ($16)

The Holy Spritz is Chetiyawardana's nod to the social element of Henry's space, and before table bottle service comes out late-night this can be made table-side. "It works well for sharing, so a big table can do this as a group," he says.

To capture the changing seasons, both sweet and sour apples are used for their opposing characteristics. The sweet apples are pureed, while the skins of tart green apples are cooked sous vide with Dolin Blanc, star anise, and orange for one and half hours, before being strained and bottled. The process pulls out some flavors that, for Chetiyawardana, are "reminiscent of chamomile and vanilla." St. Germain and house-made rosewater seltzer are added, then the cocktail is topped with torched fresh blueberry and a final shaving of fennel.