Slideshow: First Look: Cocktails from Christopher Longoria at 1760, San Francisco

The 1760 ($10)
The 1760 ($10)

1760's namesake cocktail was more or less an improvisation, says Longoria. "When Gianpaolo [Paterlini,1760's wine director] first approached me about working with him, he was like, 'Why don't you mix something up for me?' And this was it."

The drink is a blend of La Vida mezcal, City of London gin, Cointreau, cumin, lemon, and fresh mint, topped with a pour of Fever Tree tonic water. "The botanicals of gin work with the mint; the smoke of the mezcal works with the earthiness of the cumin," Longoria explained. "My original idea was centered around mint and cumin; I figured out what spirits would work best from there."

Strawberry Shrub ($12)
Strawberry Shrub ($12)

"The first think you'll see when you order this cocktail is the sous vide bag," Longoria said of this shrub-based summer cocktail. "The bags are cut to order." Fresh strawberries, Thai basil, and Katz Viognier Honey Vinegar are combined with Strega liqueur in the flavor-loaded packages and cooked sous vide for three minutes. They're cooled in an ice bath before being shaken with Gruven vodka, Dolin dry vermouth, and lemon.

Vanilla-Belgian Ale ($11)
Vanilla-Belgian Ale ($11)
"I don't drink vodka cocktails very much, but I thought this could be a fun way to enjoy it," Longfield said of this vodka-based beer cocktail. Gruven vodka and Duvel Golden Ale are blended with vanilla bean-infused orange juice. "This is an Indian summer-type cocktail for San Francisco," Longoria said, pointing out the flecks of vanilla bean suspended in the drink.
Garam-Masala Cardamom ($11)
Garam-Masala Cardamom ($11)
"This drink is the favorite of Chef Suzette [Gresham-Tognetti] at Acquerello," Longoria said of this herb-focused concoction. Elijah Craig 12-year bourbon is blended with toasted green cardamom simple syrup, fresh thyme, orange oil, and garam masala. The drink is triple strained—through a hawthorne strainer, cheesecloth, and a fine-mesh strainer —to prevent the garam masala from gathering at the bottom of the glass. "You want to be able to taste the garam masala, but you don't want it to dominate," says Longoria.