Slideshow: Ask a Cicerone: What's Your Least Favorite Style of Beer?

Bourbon Barrel Aged Beers
Bourbon Barrel Aged Beers

"I’ve been amazed at the banality of the bourbon barrel aged beers that breweries have produced these past three to four years. I don’t think it will pass, either. Yes, these barreled beers tend to be Imperial Stouts/Porters, but I’ve even seen pale ales and wheat beers that were given the same treatment. The aging process has not only made the beer more expensive, it has let brewers get away with some of the common problems they might run into after racking (i.e., they are covering up their imperfections with the harshness of the barrel). Instead of individualizing the beer, the barrel has muddied the waters and homogenized the taste of each of these robust styles. I like bourbon in its own right. I like beer on its own, too. The two are better alone." — Jay Rose (Urge American Gastropub)

American Black Ales
American Black Ales

"For my palate, the bitter character of roasted malts doesn’t always pair well with the resiny, piney, citrusy character of many American hop varietals used in some  examples of the American Black Ale style (A.K.A. “Black IPA” or “Cascadian Dark Ale”). That said; there are some examples of this style that I have truly enjoyed." — Rob Hill (Total Wine & More & Total Guide to Beer)

Belgian Quadrupel
Belgian Quadrupel

"My least favorite beer style is a Belgian Quadrupel. First of all, I am not a big fan of the yeast character as I am sensitive to fruity esters. Secondly, I have never been a drinker of high alcohol beers. And thirdly, they're just too darn sweet for me! Give me some balance!" — Sarah Huska (Eureka! Burger)

Strength Arms Race
Strength Arms Race

"A trend I would like to see go away is 'my beer is bigger than your beer'. High gravity beers just for the sake of high gravity have really gotten away from us. I enjoy a strong beer as much as the next red blooded American, but let's find some balance and nuance in our beer. More flavor and impact does not mean it is better" — Jensen Cummings (Slotted Spoon)

Belgian Dubbels
Belgian Dubbels

"I'm not a fan of Belgian Dubbels. They are just too fruit forward and malty for me to really enjoy them. This might be blasphemy, but between a Chimay Red and a PBR, I'm drinking PBR 99% of the time.

An overall trend I'm tired of is calling everything an IPA. Black IPA, brown IPA, white IPA, session IPA, Belgian IPA. IPA used to mean something, now it is just added to the description of anything that has a hint of hops." — Matt Eggers (Dog & Duck Pub)

New Ingredients
New Ingredients

"I can't generalize and say that there's a style that I least like, but I'm a little cynical when seeing a new ingredient in beer. There's a fine line between innovation and gimmickry, and sometimes I find examples that not only cross, but leap over the line—and not with strong execution, at that." — James Tai (Pinch)

Craft Beer Knockoffs
Craft Beer Knockoffs

"I try to be a cheerleader in general for beer, but I have to say that bland American lagers are hard to get behind, particularly because of their effect of homogenizing the market for so many decades. It has been a long, hard march for craft beer to get where it is today. That being said, what has irked me among brewing trends is these same massive breweries turning around and producing craft-ish beers. I don't want to name names, but if you're a brewery that makes millions of barrels a year of cheap, bland lager, and you have recently started brewing citrus-infused wheat beers, I'm probably talking about you." — Robert Johnson (Standard Market)