Slideshow: First Look: New Cocktails at The Breslin, NYC

Me & My Gin
Me & My Gin
“In the past there was a whole Gin & Tonic menu, so basically what I did was roll that all into one new drink,” explains Anderson. He’s created a tonic syrup made with cinchona bark, allspice, lime and orange zest, lemongrass, citric acid, and sugar. “I wanted to go for a more traditional, classic tonic recipe that wouldn’t speak over the different styles of gin," he says. "Something straightforward that would be a great match for whatever it was paired with." Guests have the option of choosing between one of four gins for their pick-your-own-poison cocktail: classic Beefeater, Navy Strength Perry’s Tot, The 86 Co's Fords Gin, or Death’s Door from Wisconsin.
Over the Edge
Over the Edge
Anderson describes this drink as “kind of a whiskey sour with a bit of a vinegary-savory element.” Falling more on the “adventurous side of the menu,” the base of the cocktail was inspired by a lacto-fermented kimchi juice from Hawthorne Valley Farm that owner Ken Friedman once brought back to the restaurant. “I tried it and immediately thought Pickleback,” says Anderson. “I’ve been playing a lot with shrubs recently, so I did a pineapple-rosemary one with the kimchi juice.” To that he adds Old Forester bourbon (“I figured someone who enjoys a Pickleback would be drinking whiskey”), a splash of lemon juice and Cardamaro, a slightly nutty amaro flavored with cardoon and blessed thistle.
Transformer
Transformer
“I find a lot of times when I finish a shift I’m torn between wanting a beer and a cocktail—something like a Negroni," says Anderson. "One time I was hanging out with my brother and it hit me: What about a Negroni made with beer?” Actually a riff on an Americano, this beer aperitif cocktail mixes Aperol with Dolin Rouge sweet vermouth, then gets topped with Shiner Ruby Redbird lager and a grapefruit twist garnish.
Moon Safari
Moon Safari
For this variation on a French 75, Anderson uses Gordon’s gin, a syrup made with herbs de Provence, fresh lemon juice, and Val de Mer Crémant de Bourgogne sparkling rosé. “This one is intended as a crowd-pleaser—an approachable, great-at-any-part-of-the-day cocktail,” he says.
Psycho Candy
Psycho Candy
Anderson also intends for this tequila-based play on a Gimlet to be a crowd-pleaser. Here, the classic recipe’s base spirit, gin, serves as a jumping off point for the flavor profile. “I thought, ‘What if I did a syrup using gin botanicals—star anise, cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom, allspice—but took out the juniper, which is what gives gin its characteristic flavor’,” says Anderson. The botanical syrup is then mixed with Pueblo Viejo blanco tequila and a combination of lime and pineapple juices.
Siamese Dream
Siamese Dream
This cocktail, named after a Smashing Pumpkins album, calls for basil-infused El Dorado 3 Year Cask Aged Demerara rum, Velvet Falernum, and lime juice. The glass is rimmed with a mixture of sugar, salt, and “pudding spice,” a traditional English catchall spice used to season pie. “At heart it’s a daiquiri but with an added floral-vegetal quality from the basil and a savory note from the spice rim,” says Anderson.
Fever to Tell
Fever to Tell
“The kitchen had this andouille sausage that was seasoned with Calabrian chili—it’s mild but had a particular musky thing that I liked,” explains Anderson. “In the drink it adds a mild, savory kind of heat. It’s like a little bite on your tongue, I think of them having a role more like bitters, a middle note in the drink.” The syrup gets shaken with Old Overholt Rye, Cynar, lemon juice, and fresh mint. “I think of this as a super approachable Whiskey Smash—the amaro deepens the profile and the mint brings in seasonality.”
Eat a Peach
Eat a Peach
Anderson says this cocktail is “intended as an aperitif, but for the Martini drinker.” High West oat vodka gets macerated with local peaches, Morenita cream sherry, and Dolin Blanc.
Blood Red Sky
Blood Red Sky
A variation on the classic Blood & Sand, this spirit-forward cocktail blends Szechuan peppercorn-infused Pig's Nose Scotch with orange juice, Dolin Rouge sweet vermouth, and Cherry Heering. “You get washes of cherry, orange, spices, sweet vermouth, and then you get smokiness and a buzz on the tip of your tongue from the Scotch,” says Anderson. He adds: “It’s a great pairing for proteins, or as an after-dinner drink.”