Gallery: Snapshots from the Guinness Storehouse in Dublin

Welcome to St. James Street
Welcome to St. James Street
Vintage Guinness Ads
Vintage Guinness Ads
Guinness has been promoting oyster pairings since 1906. Per the ad: "Guinness is also enjoyed before meals, after exercise or when one is tired, and before retiring." So yeah, pretty much any time is Guinness time.
The Original Guinness Harp Logo
The Original Guinness Harp Logo
The harp first appeared on Guinness branding in 1862, well before Harp lager showed up on the Irish beer scene.
More Vintage Ads
More Vintage Ads
Sharing!
Sharing!
The Guinness Guide to Profitable Snacks
The Guinness Guide to Profitable Snacks
There's a whole section of the Guinness Storehouse devoted to its archive, which preserves ads and other historical records from the brewery spanning back to 1759. Here's a gem we found: a guide to snacks, but only the profitable ones.
How to Pour a Proper Pint
How to Pour a Proper Pint
Start with a cool, dry, clean pint glass.
Pour at a 45-Degree Angle
Pour at a 45-Degree Angle
The glass should be tilted under the tap at a 45-degree angle to avoid extra air from entering the glass. Slowly straighten the glass as it fills, stopping when it's 3/4 of the way full.
Let it Settle
Let it Settle
Set the glass down to allow the gas bubbles to rise to the top, creating a creamy head. It's mesmerizing to watch, almost like sand falling and swirling down the glass. You should wait until the head is between 10-15mm high if you want to get specific (and they do at Guinness HQ).
Top It Off
Top It Off
Now it's time to fill the last fourth of the pint. Push the tap handle away from the glass, stopping when the head is at the brim so it can puff over the glass a bit.
119.5 Seconds Later...
119.5 Seconds Later...
The total pint-pouring time should be precisely 119.5 seconds. The creamy head will brim over the top, resting above the dark stout. Now that's a pretty perfect pint. Slainte!
Ever Tried Guinness Foreign Extra?
Ever Tried Guinness Foreign Extra?
On the left is Guinness's Foreign Extra Stout, poured in a stubbier Dutch-style glass. It's especially popular in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean where you can find it in bottles in lieu of the normal draft. Almost twice as strong (7.5% alcohol compared to 4.2%) it's much sweeter, richer, and maltier. "It's like our red wine," joked one of the Guinness Storehouse bartenders. If you're into stronger stouts, you should really seek it out.
A Visit from the Obamas
A Visit from the Obamas
The Obamas couldn't visit Ireland in 2011 without a stop at the Guinness Storehouse.