Slideshow: 12 Cocktails to Celebrate Mardi Gras at Home

Ramos Fizz
Ramos Fizz
If you can't make it to Cure in New Orleans to watch the bartenders shake and shake and shake this classic gin cocktail, consider enlisting a few friends to help. A touch of orange flower water adds aromatic complexity.

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[Photo: Robyn Lee]

Daiquiri
Daiquiri
Attention: a real daiquiri has very little to do with the drive-in slushies you'll see in New Orleans. This classic drink is a serious cocktail, made tart with lots of fresh lime.

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Hurricane
Hurricane
Back away from the premixed drinks—this cocktail, when made correctly, is fruity and tart, with a nice hit of fresh lemon and rich dark rum. We like to use B.G. Reynolds' passion fruit syrup.

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[Photo: Robyn Lee]

Pimm's Cup
Pimm's Cup
A tall-and-simple Pimm's Cup at Napoleon House is a New Orleans tradition, but you can get fancy with your homemade version, throwing in whatever garnishes you want. (Unfortunately strawberries aren't quite in season yet.)

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[Photo: Robyn Lee]

Vieux Carré
Vieux Carré
Boozy but super smooth, this rye-and-cognac based cocktail is sweetened with Benedictine and stirred with bitters.

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Pomme en Croute
Pomme en Croute
An autumnal variation on the classic Brandy Crusta, invented by Chris Hannah of Arnaud's French 75 in New Orleans. Applejack, Campari, fresh orange, and lemon make for a bright and fruity—but not too sweet—drink. Rim the glass with sugar; it's part of the fun.

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[Photo: Rachel Tepper]

Milk Punch
Milk Punch
Brandy milk punch is a bit like a no-egg eggnog, but it's refreshing when poured over a mountain of crushed ice. Warning: this is a pretty potent way to kick off brunch. Feel free to adjust the sugar to your taste.

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[Photo: Robyn Lee]

High End Grasshopper
High End Grasshopper
Legend has it that the Grasshopper was created in New Orleans at Tujague's. Make yours at home with fresh DIY Creme de Menthe made with real mint. For the cocktail, just shake your mint infusion with ice and equal parts creme de cacao and cream for a sippable dessert.

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French 75
French 75
An easy cocktail worth remembering: it's tart, herbal, refreshing, and effervescent. Don't feel like you have to use real Champagne, but do go with something drinkable.

Editor's tip: we also love a Meyer Lemon French 75; if you're using Meyer lemon juice, cut the sugar down by half.

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[Photo: Robyn Lee]