Slideshow: Make Your Own Beer: 15 Great Homebrew Recipes To Try

Robust Porter
Robust Porter
This extract recipe is great for beginners, and not just because a darker beer can hide some of the common mistakes that homebrewers tend to make when they're just starting out. Think of the resulting brew as an Americanized version of the classic English brown porter: it's bold, slightly higher in alcohol, with more assertive hop flavor that you'd expect from the English variation. Want to walk through the fermentation process step by step? Our homebrewing expert Joe Postma created this brew-along to help you do just that. Read more and get the recipe »
American IPA
American IPA
An extract recipe for beginners, featuring Sorachi Ace and Simcoe hops. A little dry hopping (adding hops to the secondary fermentation) bolsters the flavors. Read more »
Belgian Tripel
Belgian Tripel
This Trappist-style beer is made with a simple extract recipe for beginning homebrewers. You might want to sample some commercial examples before you start brewing, such as St. Bernardus Tripel or Chimay white label. This beer will age well as long as you store it in a cool, dark place. Read more »
Dry Stout
Dry Stout
You'll need roasted, unmalted barley to make this delicious Dry Irish Stout. The result is a sessionable beer that's just right for drinking with barbecue. This recipe is a good one for those who are making the transition from extract to all-grain brewing. Read more »
Single-Malt, Single-Hop IPA
Single-Malt, Single-Hop IPA
Learn about what each ingredient adds to a beer by limiting your recipe to one type of malt and one type of hops. Here, Jonathan Moxey pairs new-ish Mosaic hops (known for their tropical fruit and floral flavors) with sweet, clean Golden Promise malt. Read more »
American Wheat Ale
American Wheat Ale
Intermediate-level brewers can get ready for summer with this crisp American-style wheat ale (think citrusy hops and clean yeast, not the banana and clove flavors that would result from using Hefeweizen strains.) Read more »
Belgian Dubbel
Belgian Dubbel
This brew tastes like plums, raisins, caramel, and warm bread; a malt parade with a restrained bitterness to keep things in check. You'll need to make a yeast starter before you begin to make sure you have plenty of healthy yeast. Read more »
California Common
California Common
Intermediate homebrewers will have fun playing with this historical style—and if you like Anchor Brewing's Steam Beer, you'll like drinking it, too. Fermentation of this beer is done with a California lager yeast and kept cool during conditioning. Read more »
Berliner Weisse
Berliner Weisse
It's too bad there aren't more commercial examples of Berliner Weisse on the market: we love to drink this light, tart, low-alcohol beer. Using Lactobacillus, you'll help this beer develop its signature tangy, sour flavor. Read more »
Russian Imperial Stout
Russian Imperial Stout
It's a bit trickier to brew high-alcohol beers such as this big stout, but once you have five or so brewing sessions under your belt, you'll be ready to explore this recipe, which calls for chocolate malt and roasted barley. Read more »
Imperial IPA
Imperial IPA
It's fun to brew this super-hoppy high-alcohol beer, but fermentation control—and using plenty of yeast—is very important. This recipe is inspired by Avery Brewing Company's Maharaja, and the result is a hophead's dream. Read more »
Sour Saison
Sour Saison
Once you delve into the world of the funky Brettanomyces or the tart Pediococcus, homebrewing takes on an entirely different dimension. It also takes some patience: this ale needs to age for a year for the tart and barnyardy flavors to full develop. Read more »