Slideshow: Behind the Scenes at Harvest Spirits, Home of Cornelius Applejack and Core Vodka

The Distillery
The Distillery
What does a small batch distillery look like? This is most of it. The room used to be a cold storage chamber for the farm's produce, but Derek convinced his father to turn it into a distillery, and raised the capital to purchase all the equipment. Harvest Spirits sold its first product, Core apple vodka, in 2008.
Apples
Apples
The apple vodka and applejack are made with a rotating blend of apples grown by the farm. When selecting apples to distill, Derek looks to balance sweet and tart flavors, which make for a smoother, more rounded drink.

Bad weather has led to a shortage of apples all around upstate New York, which cideries and distilleries like Harvest Spirits have felt acutely. But farmers and communities have pulled together, sharing stocks to keep production going. So even if the apples going into current batches of Harvest Spirits apple products aren't made with apples from their farm, they aren't coming from too far away either.

Pears
Pears
The farm doesn't grow the pears for its brandy and eau de vie (same for the grapes for their grappa), but they purchase from nearby farms. It's a win-win, as distilling is a great way to use up less-than-pretty fruit that might otherwise go to waste. The distillery makes two pear brandies: an aged version and a clear eau de vie. Unlike the apple spirits, the pear spirits are made with puréed pears instead of a more refined cider.
Distillation
Distillation
The hard cider (or in the case of our visit, hard pear mush) then runs through the still—twice for the brandies and applejack, and three times for the vodka.
Distillation
Distillation
A batch of fermented pear mush on its way to becoming brandy. Using puréed pears instead of pear cider is "a huge mess to clean out," says assistant distiller Peter Upstill, but they think the results are well worth it. Skins and pulp add extra flavor to the final product.
Temperature Management
Temperature Management
Each distillation is run at a specific temperature. The pear brandy cooks at 103°C.
Bottling
Bottling
The four-nozzle bottler for the operation. Did I say small-batch already? Yeah, that.
Peter Upstill
Peter Upstill
Yup, that's his real name. The assistant distiller works with Derek on the ins and outs of the operation, and is also a collaborator on some of the infusion projects you'll see hanging out near the aging barrels.
Aging projects
Aging projects
Such as the raspberry, black currant, Christmas tree...
Peach Jack
Peach Jack
Faced with some mealy but tasty peaches, the team soaked them in some aged applejack, then aged the result for another year before bottling. The Peach Jack has a lower proof (30% alcohol instead of the applejack's 40%) and a higher sugar content, since the peaches add water and sugar to the spirit. It's a remarkably aromatic brew, and not too sweet.
Bottles
Bottles
Things get a little cramped when your bottling, fermenting, distilling, and aging all happen in one big room, but it's not long before these guys will be out the door on their way to a grateful New York State.