Slideshow: Ask A Bartender: What Cocktail Should Be More Popular Than It Is?

Whiskey Sour
Whiskey Sour
"Bar none, the most underrated cocktail is a classic whiskey sour. The balance between bourbon, lemon, egg white, sugar, and bitters is simply magical.  It spans all seasons and can make a non-bourbon drinker a convert for life.  Basically, have a classic whiskey sour if you haven't yet. It will change your life." — Joel Teitelbaum (Harry Denton’s Starlight Room)
Sazerac
Sazerac
"I think most of the classic cocktails that I want to see gain more popularity are actually doing so. I'm excited about how many people order a Manhattan or Old Fashioned at the MB Post. However, if I could trade a Sazerac for every vodka soda ordered, the world would be a happier place." —Gregory Wescott (Manhattan Beach Post)
Jack Rose
Jack Rose
"I wish more people would come to me and ask for a Jack Rose. I have only made two, both for the same guest, since I got back into bartending, but I love that drink. With the quality ingredients we have availble to us, being able to make real grenadine, having Laird's Bonded Applejack and fresh juices, there is no reason this drink shouldn't be on beverage napkins all over the world." — Elizabeth Powell (ArtBar)
Gin & Tonic
Gin & Tonic
"Gin & tonic. Yeah. That's what I said. Let's face it: gin on its own can be pretty vile and tonic by itself is almost undrinkable but put the two of them together and something magical happens." —John Cummins (The Dawson Lounge)
Tennessee
Tennessee
"I've championed the Tennessee [rye, lemon, maraschino] for a bunch of years. I think it's the perfect summer rye drink." —Todd Maul (Clio)
Aviation
Aviation
"The Aviation. It is popular amongst cocktail people but overlooked by the general public and definitely lagging behind favorites like the Negroni and the Manhattan. But it's a simple three (or four) ingredient cocktail and it's delicious." —Dave McCabe ( Punk's Backyard Grill )
A Great Martini
A Great Martini
"A really, truly well-made Martini. Good gin. Good, well-kept vermouth. Particular bitters. Stirred to an elegant, sexy consistency that is easy to sip and easy to enjoy." — Nate Howell (Cusp Dining & Drinks)
Tom Collins (and variations)
Tom Collins (and variations)
"I'm always surprised that people don't order a Tom Collins more often—it is such a light and fresh drink (a great entry level drink for people who think they "don't like gin") and pretty simple to make. If you use great ingredients it is a great drink and it is so simple to add a fun seasonal twist. At any given moment you can probably find 2-3 Tom Collins—based drinks on my signature list, like the Fennel Collins in which we use fennel pollen syrup to sweeten fresh lemon juice instead of using lemonade." — Lauren Lathrop Williams (Jsix Restaurant)
Tom Collins
Tom Collins
"A lot of classics have become very popular again, but most of them are stirred, very spirit-forward cocktails. Things like the Martinez, Old Fashioned, Manhattan etc. While I enjoy all of those cocktails I have always been a strong Tom Collins proponent. The Collins can almost endlessly be modified with a ½ oz of your favorite liqueur, a few dashes of seasonal bitters, or a sprig of fresh herbs." — Daniel Nelson (Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing)
Negroni
Negroni
"A Negroni—it’s a great aperitif that I think many Americans do not appreciate. Americans get sweet, tart, sour, salty flavors but often forget about bitter and often think of it as the ‘bad taste’." — Evelyn Ciszak (Chakra Restaurant)
Flips
Flips
"Flips in general should be more popular, especially with the cold weather setting in. There is definitely a reluctance (fear even?) on the part of the general public to drink something with raw egg in it, especially a whole raw egg. One of our servers asks guests, "Have you ever eaten cookie dough? Then you've eaten raw eggs." — Sarah McComber (South Water Kitchen)