Gallery: First Look: Cocktails at L'Apicio, NYC

Manhattan in the Fall
Manhattan in the Fall
To make this seasonally-inspired homage to his favorite “strong drink", Campanale combines housemade cinnamon-infused rye with Carpano Antica and Bittermens mole bitters, garnishing simply with a Luxardo cherry at the bottom of the glass. “I wanted to make something warm and spicy," says Campanale. "I’m a big cinnamon fan and I think the mole bitters add a nice darkness and depth.”
Negroni Bianco
Negroni Bianco
“I thought I was being really clever with this one, and then I found out that actually a bunch of people are making white Negronis,” remarks Campanale. The inspiration behind this colorless rendition is its starring ingredient: Cocchi Americano. “I love Cocchi and just wanted to build a cocktail around that,” he explains. “It’s not as syrupy as Campari, and a little less intense.” Here, it’s mixed with Bluecoat gin and Dolin white vermouth to create a drier, slightly mellower variation on the classic.
L'Apicio Spritz
L'Apicio Spritz
“Basically we take a bottle of Aperol, a bottle of vodka, and a box of grapefruit, squeeze the crap out of them, and put it all in a container overnight to let it steep,” explains Campanale. Bittermens hopped grapefruit bitters, a splash of sparkling wine, and a floret of fragrant oregano complete the equation on this super-refreshing cocktail. “Grapefruit and Aperol really complement each other—Aperol has a lot of great citrus notes,” he remarks on the pairing.
Dirty Spicy Martini
Dirty Spicy Martini
Although he’s not necessarily the biggest fan of dirty martinis (“I find them to be a little strong before dinner”), Campanale felt it was nevertheless important to include one on the menu. “I know a lot of people like to drink Dirtys, so I figured if people are going to drink them here I wanted to make it something that I liked,” he explains. In a nod to chef Gabe Thompson, Campanale uses B&G pepper juice (and pepper for garnish) to add a touch of spice and salt to the combination of gin, Dolin white vermouth, and celery bitters.
Montenegro Sour
Montenegro Sour
“When Gabe mentioned in passing that using raw eggs in cocktails might get banned soon, I was like, ‘OK, I have to put an egg cocktail on the menu’,” explains Campanale. This one features Montenegro amaro (“It’s a lighter amaro from Bologna—it’s not as intensely bitter or as intensely sweet”) and Amere Nouvelle, a French-style citrusy-floral potable bitters. The result is a rich and frothy drink (achieved by first dry-shaking the egg whites) that leaves a subtle, lingering bitterness on the palate.