Slideshow: 5 South-of-the-Border Cocktail Recipes From West of Pecos in San Francisco

Grandote, Para Dos
Grandote, Para Dos
Butler came up with the recipe for this updated margarita for two the morning before mixing us one. The summery, herbal drink lacks the cloying sweetness and throat parching acidity of lesser margs: the blend of cucumber, white vermouth, and green Chartreuse gives it a clean, dangerously drinkable quality.

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Pecos Punch
Pecos Punch
"Pecos, Texas is known for their cantaloupe," Butler said of this signature house drink, featuring freshly muddled fruit and fittingly served in a tin cowboy cup. This very sippable punch includes blanco tequila, basil, Aperol, and agave syrup.

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Rodeo Ghost
Rodeo Ghost
This drink, which is "basically a mezcal Negroni," is Butler's go-to on the menu. "I think the Negroni is the best drink ever invented. If you're going to know one drink, this should be it." This variation uses Zucca Amaro instead of Campari. As for the name, "The world's first rodeo took place in Pecos," Butler tells us. "We're not trying to get too yee-haw with it, but we stay somewhat on message."

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Cortez the Killer
Cortez the Killer
Served in a sturdy, blue-tinged glass from Mexico, Cortez the Killer is "another spin on a Manhattan, a tequila Manhattan," Butler tells us. The blend of reposado tequila, Bonal Quinquina, and white creme de cacao lend a rich, woody depth to the tequila drink, cut nicely by the tang of lemon oil, courtesy of a flaming rind.

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A flaming garnish for Cortez the Killer
A flaming garnish for Cortez the Killer
"Lighting stuff on fire is kind of a cheap thrill, but it helps sell the drink!" Butler said. You can substitute a regular lemon twist if you're not looking to go the flaming route.