Slideshow: The Best Cocktails We Drank in April

Alma Blanca at La Condesa, St. Helena, CA
Alma Blanca at La Condesa, St. Helena, CA
"I loved the drinks at Austin's La Condesa when I visited last fall, and the recently opened branch in St. Helena, California, has a bar just as impressive. The Alma Blanca has habanero-infused Zapopan Blanco, fresh corn, pineapple juice, and agave, but its real selling point is the XtabentĂșn, a Mexican honey and anise liqueur. It results in a cocktail that's faintly, gently anisey and totally refreshing—great with the brunch we had of tacos and a huitlacoche huarache."—Carey Jones, Senior Managing Editor
Barrel Aged Martinez at the Publican in Chicago
Barrel Aged Martinez at the Publican in Chicago
"History dictates that a Martinez cocktail is typically concocted with a base of Old Tom gin, which itself is barrel aged. So perhaps because they knew theirs would be spending time in a used bourbon barrel anyway, the Publican's bartenders eschewed tradition and opted to use Anchor Junipero gin, from San Francisco, as the base for their rich, bracing, and layered barrel-aged Martinez. The ingredients—Junipero, Carpano Antica sweet vermouth, Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur, and bitters—have been barrel-aged for about a month, which gives the flavors time to mingle, deepen, and extract some of the caramelized, brown-spirit traits of the barrel. And the figurative cherry on top just so happens to be an actual cocktail cherry. "—Roger Kamholz, Chicago contributor
Vida de Mole at Gran Electrica, Brooklyn
Vida de Mole at Gran Electrica, Brooklyn
"There are plenty of worth-ordering margaritas at the new Gran Electrica in Dumbo, Brooklyn, but my eyes zeroed in on this Mexican twist on the Negroni. Instead of gin, it's made with Del Maguey Mezcal (the Vida expression) which adds some smokiness and fruitiness to the body of a drink you thought you knew. The usual Negroni suspects, sweet vermouth and Campari, get mixed in there too, and just when you think it didn't need any other surprises—and it probably didn't—bartender Justin Fairweather adds a couple droplets of Bittermen's Xocolatl mole bitters at the end. They quietly lace each sip with a whisper of warm spices and dark cacao. It's like your best friend the Negroni went on spring break to Oaxaca."—Erin Zimmer, National Managing Editor
Sazerac at Ginny's Supper Club in Harlem, NY
Sazerac at Ginny's Supper Club in Harlem, NY
"Naming a favorite drink is almost as hard as naming a favorite Beatles album, but The Sazerac is a strong contender for the top title. I love the classic, made with good rye and a dash of Peychaud's bitters, but the slightly tweaked version from Ginny's Supper Club has been making a stir recently. Instead of straight up rye, bar Moses Laboy infuses his with caraway, giving it a mild but distinct spiciness that is reminiscent of a good Aquavit. A splash of cognac adds some honey-like sweetness, making this an altogether brighter, more complex version of the original. Better? No, but an interesting twist to stir things up once in a while? Definitely."—Kenji Lopez-Alt, Chief Creative Officer
Martini at Scofflaw in Chicago
Martini at Scofflaw in Chicago
"Until a week ago, I'm not sure I've ever had a dry Martini that I've truly loved. Sure, some have been bracing, cold, and clean, but about halfway through the drink I alway feel like I'm trying to enjoy each sip, instead of looking forward to each sip. I've had far more luck with all of the Martini's closely related cousins, like the Martinez, which balance the gin with a good bit of vermouth and bitters.

That all changed last week at Scofflaw, a new gin-focused bar in Logan Square, where I encountered a dry Martini that was inviting and completely captivating. Featuring Martin Miller's Gin, Dolin Dry Vermouth, and Regan's Orange Bitters, the drink sits heavy in the glass, with the floral notes from the vermouth playing just as big of a role as the gin. —Nick Kindelsperger, Chicago Editor

La Rosita Cocktail (at home in Providence, RI)
La Rosita Cocktail (at home in Providence, RI)
"Reposado tequila, sweet and dry vermouth, Campari, and Angostura bitters combine for the La Rosita, a spin on the classic Negroni cocktail. I mixed this one up at home for a crisp springtime refresher. Tequila and Campari play very well together, making for an herbal, lightly bitter drink that highlights tequila's agave flavor."—Michael Dietsch, Cocktail 101 columnist
Apricot Beret at Bar Congress, Austin TX
Apricot Beret at Bar Congress, Austin TX
Austin's weather has been remarkable lately and has put me in the mood for something chilled and frothy. Jason Stevens, a housemade-ingredient zealot at Bar Congress wowed me with the Apricot Beret. This stone-fruity play on the Pisco Sour is one smooth sipper. The bartender first shakes an egg white with an intense apricot preserve that he made with fresh apricot purĂ©e, apricot liqueur, and apricot jam. He follows up with Pisco, Aperol, cardamom tincture, Creme de Violette, and Green Chartreuse."—Melody Fury, Austin Contributor
Cocchi and Soda at Hearth, NYC
Cocchi and Soda at Hearth, NYC
"Sometimes the best drinks are the simplest. Case in point: a cocchi and soda with a garnish of orange peel from Hearth, light and bright and joyful enough to turn a grueling day into a happy one. Cocchi is an herbal americano like Lillet, but less sweet and more bitter (you could say more like the Kina Lillet James Bond loved so much). A wee spash of soda and a twist of orange makes a lovely two-second cocktail that I relished with a plate of favas and some sautéed greens. You can get our recipe for a cocchi soda here."—Max Falkowitz, New York Editor
Single Village Fix from Beretta, San Francisco
Single Village Fix from Beretta, San Francisco
"Beretta's bar manager, Ryan Fitzgerald, told us this drink would taste like "grilled pineapple", and he was right. But their Single Village Fix was also way more surprising than that, with a smoky complexity that stayed on the palate for some time after that first sip. It was hard to decide whether to sit there and savor or go back immediately for more."—David Kover, San Francisco contributor