Slideshow: Behind the Scenes at Kings County Distillery, Brooklyn NY

Brooklyn Moonshine & Bourbon
Brooklyn Moonshine & Bourbon
Kings County Distillery is New York City's oldest operating whiskey distillery, the first since before prohibition. Inspired by the moonshining traditions of his home state of Kentucky, master distiller and co-owner Colin Spoelman was intrigued by the challenge of creating a product that no one admits to making. After all, moonshine is, by definition, illegally distilled alcohol. (But don't worry—Colin has all of his paperwork in order, of course!)

After many distilling experimentation, and the passage of new NY state laws that made opening a distillery more profitable, KCD was born. Their moonshine came off the stills and to local distributors very quickly, and after the necessary incubation period of bourbon elapsed, they began bottling and selling their bourbon.

One Room, Many Roles
One Room, Many Roles
The tour starts in the combination tasting, aging, and store room. Surrounded by 110 5-gallon barrels of aging bourbon, we get down to spirits. KCD's class D distillery license (a.k.a. farm distillery license, here's the legalese if you're interested) allows them to conduct tastings and retail their tipples on the premises. And those yellow containers? Spent mash that is picked up every week to be fed to the lucky pigs at Arcadia Farm.
Great Grains = Superb Spirits
Great Grains = Superb Spirits
Moonshine is a simple spirit, recipe-wise. KCD uses corn, barley, yeast, and water, allowing the essence of the ingredients and the art form of distilling to shine. 50% of their grains are required to come from NY state, but the actual percentage is a bit higher. Their organic corn comes from the Finger Lakes region, and they go through about 3,000 pounds of it per month. The malted barley, which contains enzymes critical to fermentation, comes all the way from Scotland.
Mashing
Mashing
Using conventional hot plates, corn and water is heated to make a thick porridge. When the mixture hits 155° they throw in the barley.
Cooling and Yeasting
Cooling and Yeasting
After the mash has been cooked, it's cooled by a window fan. The secret process: a large ladle and lots of elbow grease. Once cooled, it's moved to large containers and yeast is introduced to begin the fermentation process.
Fermenting
Fermenting
The mash is then left to ferment for 7 days. At the end of the week, prest-o change-o, alcohol! The boozy sludge, having reached about 7% abv, is then strained to separate the mash from the wash (mash=water and grain mixture, wash=fermented barley water—the distiller's beer).
Aging the Bourbon
Aging the Bourbon
To make their bourbon, KCD fills 5-gallon charred white oak barrels from Minnesota with new make proofed to about 58% abv. After numbering and dating, they take a rest for about 9 months until mature and ready for the bottle.
Proofing
Proofing
Say hello to the large stainless steel proofing vessel! KCD adds Poland Spring water to bring their spirits down to bottling proof. While it may give you your daily dose of fluoride, NYC tap water does not good whiskey make.
Bottling
Bottling
No, that's not a medieval torture device, it's the tool that KCD uses to hand-bottle all of its products. One at time. Interns are welcome!