Slideshow: Exploring the Natural Side of Bordeaux

Horsing Around in the Vineyard
Horsing Around in the Vineyard
At Château Pontet Canet in the esteemed village of Pauillac, everything’s done the old-fashioned way, including the use of horses to plow the vineyards. But this equestrian effect isn’t sheer gimmickry: Technical Director Jean-Michel Comme explains that a horse-drawn plow inflicts far less damage to the vines than a tractor ever would.
Biodynamic Vines
Biodynamic Vines
The meticulously tended vines of Château Pontet Canet, the only “Grand Cru Classé” estate to produce its wines using entirely biodynamic methods. It began its conversion in 2004, a radical step forward for a region where many owners still fear that "going natural" might jeopardize their precious profits.
A Winemaker with a Message
A Winemaker with a Message
Almost more philosopher than winemaker, Jean-Michel Comme draws a distinction between organic viticulture—which he equates with a “warfare mentality” that uses natural pesticides to “kill off” disease in the vines—and biodynamic methods, which, according to him, involve making relational adjustments within the vineyard to foster a harmonious, self-sustaining ecosystem.
A Bug's Life
A Bug's Life
Château Guiraud recently installed a series of “insect hotels" throughout the property, which house such many-legged residents as carpenter wasps, beetles and earwigs—all natural predators that protect against undesirable larvae threatening the vines.
Stock Options
Stock Options
Château Guiraud is the only “classified growth” that produces its own vine plants. Here one of the estate’s intrepid workers grafts root-stocks for new plantings of Semillon vines.
Waiting for the Sun
Waiting for the Sun
Guiraud’s vines in the early morning fog, which typically burns off in the heat of the afternoon sun: ideal conditions for developing botrytis cinerea. This gray mold, affectionately known as “noble rot,” is a prerequisite for making Sauternes. As it gradually infects the grape skins, they shrivel into sugary sweetness, resulting in a golden elixir of unrivaled concentration and complexity.
Setting a New Bar
Setting a New Bar
A younger generation of drinkers within the city of Bordeaux now flocks to spots like Le Bo Bar: this forward-thinking wine bar not only focuses on the “natural” side of Bordeaux wine, but offers wines from other regions in France as well, which is pretty uncommon for wine bars in the region.
No Wine List, No Problem
No Wine List, No Problem
Taking a few cues from the renowned natural wine destinations of Paris, Le Bo Bar skips the wine list. Customers simply choose a bottle from the shelf, where a vast assortment of liquid riches awaits pairing with the daily chalkboard specials.
Epic Rillettes
Epic Rillettes
The unforgettable charcuterie plate at Le Bo Bar. These salty meats were perfectly accompanied by a glass of the 2009 “Clos 19 Bis” Graves Supérieur, an ethereally light, faintly off-dry Semillon-Sauvignon blend produced by up-and-coming Bordeaux winemaker Vincent Quirac. Unfortunately, his bottles have yet to arrive on US shores.
No Chemical Dependency Here
No Chemical Dependency Here
Tufts of wildflowers run amok in Château Coutet’s idyllic vineyards, a testament to the microbial richness of their pesticide-free soil. “The more healthy and dynamic the soil,” the owner claims, “the more healthy and dynamic the wine.”
Soiled Soils
Soiled Soils
These chemically-sprayed vines from an anonymous neighbor’s vineyard reveal a stark study in contrasts.
The Back Catalog
The Back Catalog
The last remaining bottles of 1961 Château Coutet. If only we all had family cellars...