Slideshow: Kahlúa From Bean To Bottle

First Stop: Veracruz
First Stop: Veracruz
The coffee extract used in Kahlúa starts with hand-picked Arabica beans from Veracruz. We visited the coffee museum at El Cafe-tal in Coatepec, Veracruz to learn more.
A coffee culture
A coffee culture
Our guide grew up drinking coffee and started her sons guzzling the stuff when they were babies. By the time our tour started at 10am, she’d already put back four cups.
Examining the beans
Examining the beans
Inside the ripe cherry's red husk sits a coffee bean. The beans are hand-picked to ensure that each one is really ripe. While machines are certainly more efficient, the lack of a trained eye runs the risk of unripe beans in your morning coffee.
Husking machine
Husking machine
The husking machine takes the dried beans and brushes off the papery white skin. There are different-sized slots in the machine to sort the beans by size.
Beans ready for roasting
Beans ready for roasting
The beans arrive at the distillery and await the roasting process in 1000 kilogram bags.
Tostador de cafe
Tostador de cafe
This machine roasts the coffee, and man, does it smell good.
Meet Alfredo Pérez Nava
Meet Alfredo Pérez Nava
He oversees the entire process at the Kahlúa factory. Here, he's taking out a sample to do quality control before the roasted beans go into holding tanks.
Same coffee, different roasts
Same coffee, different roasts
Clockwise from bottom left: samples roasted 8, 10, 12, 14, and 15 minutes.
Grinding the Beans
Grinding the Beans
The beans are ground twelve hours after roasting. Here, a sample of the ground beans heads over to quality control to make sure that it's ground to the proper size.
The Separador de Cafe
The Separador de Cafe
After the coffee is brewed for almost an hour, it runs through this big filter.
It looks like soil, but smells like coffee
It looks like soil, but smells like coffee
After brewing, the factory sends truckloads of filtered coffee grinds to local farmers to use as fertilizer.
What does 96.2% alcohol taste like?
What does 96.2% alcohol taste like?
The rum that goes into Kahlua starts out seriously boozy—before dilution, it tastes a bit like nail polish remover. This spirit gets diluted and added to the coffee (with a little caramel coloring and vanilla) to make Kahlua. Then it's rested, filtered, and bottled.
Lots of Labels
Lots of Labels
Each bottle gets a label on the front and another on the back, and then receives the red-ribboned seal of Kahlúa.
Ready to drink
Ready to drink
Boxed up and ready for shipment.